Human resource planning: Challenges for industrial/organizational psychologists

Susan E. Jackson, Randall S. Schuler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human resource planning has traditionally been used by organizations to ensure that the right person is in the right job at the right time. Under past conditions of relative environmental certainty and stability, human resource planning focused on the short term and was dictated largely by line management concerns. Increasing environmental instability, demographic shifts, changes in technology, and heightened international competition are changing the need for and the nature of human resource planning in leading organizations. Planning is increasingly the product of the interaction between line management and planners. In addition, organizations are realizing that in order to adequately address human resource concerns, they must develop long-term as well as short-term solutions. As human resource planners involve themselves in more programs to serve the needs of the business, and even influence the direction of the business, they face new and increased responsibilities and challenges.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-239
Number of pages17
JournalAmerican Psychologist
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

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