"I Have Papers So I Can Go Anywhere!": Everyday Talk About Citizenship in a Mixed-Status Mexican Family

Ariana Mangual Figueroa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article draws from ethnographic data collected during a 23-month-language socialization study of mixed-status Mexican families living in the New Latino Diaspora. The analysis focuses on the ways in which siblings in one family talk about citizenship during a discursive event that I call the Planning for the Future Routine. The findings show that siblings communicate two key understandings during everyday conversations: first, the relevance of migratory status to their day-to-day lives and second, their family's shared conventions for talking about citizenship status in the home. As children and youth demonstrate the social norms for talking about citizenship, they also express their understanding of the ways that being a United States or Mexican citizen shapes their future opportunities. A nuanced understanding of intrafamily diversity and learning experiences can strengthen educators', researchers', and policy makers' ability to advocate for Latino communities' well-being and educational equity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-311
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Language, Identity and Education
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Keywords

  • Mexican
  • citizenship
  • language socialization
  • migration
  • mixed status
  • siblings

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