Identification and differentiation of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus by polymerase chain reaction

Karl Matthews, J. Roberson, B. E. Gillespie, D. A. Luther, S. P. Oliver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is an etiological agent of a wide variety of human and animal infections. The majority of S. aureus are coagulase-positive; however, some may be atypical in that they do not produce coagulase. Incorrect identification of an isolate can impact implementation of effective treatment and/or control measures. In this study, polymerase chain reaction based DNA fingerprinting was used to differentiate coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus (CPSA) from coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus (CNSA). A total of 29 CNSA and 50 CPSA were evaluated. PCR-based DNA fingerprinting differentiated CNSA from CPSA on the basis of visible observation and densitometric evaluation. The method is rapid and accurate, eliminating variability associated with conventional techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)686-688
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of food protection
Volume60
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Microbiology

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