Identifying the microstructural features associated with void nucleation during elevated-temperature deformation of copper

Philip J. Noell, Nipal Deka, Ryan B. Sills, Brad L. Boyce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The microstructural-scale mechanisms that produce cracks in metals during deformation at elevated temperatures are relevant to applications that involve thermal exposure. Prior studies of cavitation during high-temperature deformation, for example, creep, suffered from an inability to directly observe the microstructural evolution that occurs during deformation and leads to void nucleation. The current study takes advantage of modern high-speed electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) detectors to observe cavitation in oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper in situ during deformation at 300°C. Most voids formed at the triple junction between a twin boundary and a high-angle grain boundary (HAGB). This finding does not contradict previous studies that suggested that twins are resistant to cracking—it reveals that cracks in HAGBs originate at twin/HAGB triple junctions and that cracks preferentially grow along HAGBs rather than the accompanying twins. Atomistic simulations explored the origins of this observation and suggest that twin/HAGB triple junctions are microstructural weak points.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1882-1899
Number of pages18
JournalFatigue and Fracture of Engineering Materials and Structures
Volume45
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Materials Science
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Keywords

  • cavitation
  • cavity nucleation
  • high-temperature damage
  • in situ testing
  • interfaces

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Identifying the microstructural features associated with void nucleation during elevated-temperature deformation of copper'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this