Improving the environmental Kuznets curve for evaluating the relationships between carbon dioxide emissions and economic development

Fengxia Zhao, Ming Xu, Yunpu Zheng, Michelle Hang Gi Wong, Yonggang Chi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study we used an improved approach to test the EKC hypothesis for carbon dioxide emissions by taking the first-order derivative of the traditional quadratic EKC equation. We found the long-term historical carbon dioxide emissions rarely supported the EKC theory at various scales (country to globe), but the short-term (especially the most recent decades) carbon dioxide emissions widely supported the EKC hypothesis. We concluded that though the overall development of a country or region might not follow an EKC pattern, but the EKC hypothesis might still be justified during different periods of the economic growth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1193-1199
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Food, Agriculture and Environment
Volume11
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

Kuznets curve
Economic Development
economic development
Carbon Dioxide
carbon dioxide
economic growth
chemical derivatives
testing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Keywords

  • Economic growth
  • Linear regression model
  • Oil shock
  • Peak
  • Region

Cite this

@article{45c361c5f5d9423789d47d9c330c7b8a,
title = "Improving the environmental Kuznets curve for evaluating the relationships between carbon dioxide emissions and economic development",
abstract = "In this study we used an improved approach to test the EKC hypothesis for carbon dioxide emissions by taking the first-order derivative of the traditional quadratic EKC equation. We found the long-term historical carbon dioxide emissions rarely supported the EKC theory at various scales (country to globe), but the short-term (especially the most recent decades) carbon dioxide emissions widely supported the EKC hypothesis. We concluded that though the overall development of a country or region might not follow an EKC pattern, but the EKC hypothesis might still be justified during different periods of the economic growth.",
keywords = "Economic growth, Linear regression model, Oil shock, Peak, Region",
author = "Fengxia Zhao and Ming Xu and Yunpu Zheng and Wong, {Michelle Hang Gi} and Yonggang Chi",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "1193--1199",
journal = "Journal of Food, Agriculture and Environment",
issn = "1459-0255",
publisher = "World Food Ltd. and WFL Publishers",
number = "2",

}

Improving the environmental Kuznets curve for evaluating the relationships between carbon dioxide emissions and economic development. / Zhao, Fengxia; Xu, Ming; Zheng, Yunpu; Wong, Michelle Hang Gi; Chi, Yonggang.

In: Journal of Food, Agriculture and Environment, Vol. 11, No. 2, 01.01.2013, p. 1193-1199.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Improving the environmental Kuznets curve for evaluating the relationships between carbon dioxide emissions and economic development

AU - Zhao, Fengxia

AU - Xu, Ming

AU - Zheng, Yunpu

AU - Wong, Michelle Hang Gi

AU - Chi, Yonggang

PY - 2013/1/1

Y1 - 2013/1/1

N2 - In this study we used an improved approach to test the EKC hypothesis for carbon dioxide emissions by taking the first-order derivative of the traditional quadratic EKC equation. We found the long-term historical carbon dioxide emissions rarely supported the EKC theory at various scales (country to globe), but the short-term (especially the most recent decades) carbon dioxide emissions widely supported the EKC hypothesis. We concluded that though the overall development of a country or region might not follow an EKC pattern, but the EKC hypothesis might still be justified during different periods of the economic growth.

AB - In this study we used an improved approach to test the EKC hypothesis for carbon dioxide emissions by taking the first-order derivative of the traditional quadratic EKC equation. We found the long-term historical carbon dioxide emissions rarely supported the EKC theory at various scales (country to globe), but the short-term (especially the most recent decades) carbon dioxide emissions widely supported the EKC hypothesis. We concluded that though the overall development of a country or region might not follow an EKC pattern, but the EKC hypothesis might still be justified during different periods of the economic growth.

KW - Economic growth

KW - Linear regression model

KW - Oil shock

KW - Peak

KW - Region

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84880319181&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84880319181&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84880319181

VL - 11

SP - 1193

EP - 1199

JO - Journal of Food, Agriculture and Environment

JF - Journal of Food, Agriculture and Environment

SN - 1459-0255

IS - 2

ER -