Improvising within the system: Creating new teacher performances in inner-city schools

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Teachers’ lives are dominated by scripts: the overt scripts of the curriculum, the “hidden” scripts of race, class, language, and culture, and the societal scripts of how teachers and students are supposed to relate to each other. All of these, however, are informed by the meta-script that the primary job of the teacher is to help children acquire knowledge and skills–a deeply embedded cultural model of teaching and learning that has been referred to as instructionism (Papert, 1994), as transmission and acquisition (Rogoff, 1990; Sfard, 1998), or as the banking model (Freire, 1994). Teachers are supposed to find the best techniques for helping children learn more so that they can know more. Reform efforts that aim at addressing the current problems in education generally attempt to make such learning more efficient, equitable, or accountable through smaller classes, culturally relevant pedagogy, and a major focus on testing and assessment. By many accounts (Darling-Hammond, 2007; Kohn, 2004; Kozol, 2005; Meier & Wood, 2004; Sizer, 2004), these efforts are not succeeding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationStructure and Improvisation in Creative Teaching
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages73-93
Number of pages21
ISBN (Electronic)9780511997105
ISBN (Print)9780521762519
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

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    Lobman, C. (2011). Improvising within the system: Creating new teacher performances in inner-city schools. In Structure and Improvisation in Creative Teaching (pp. 73-93). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511997105.005