In vitro dynamic simulation of elbow motion

M. L. Lazar, A. Lurski, S. Ghafurian, L. Chen, L. Uko, V. Tan, K. Li

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Elbow disorders are a common occurrence; however, our understandings of complex elbow dislocation and the functional anatomy of the elbow joint are still very limited. The efficacy of treatment strategies of this injury is largely unknown. The purpose of this study is to create an active elbow simulator using a new paradigm, In vitro joint simulation driven by in vivo motion, to study how elbow injuries affect joint kinematics. The elbow simulator uses an open source program to calculate muscle-tendon lengths based on elbow joint angles. It then uses five actuators to pull cables attached at five muscle attachment points to create a realistic motion of a cadaver arm. By cutting certain tendons, injury can be simulated and kinematics can be compared to the intact arm. Thus, the effects of injuries and their treatments on elbow kinematics can be better understood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2015 41st Annual Northeast Biomedical Engineering Conference, NEBEC 2015
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9781479983605
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2 2015
Event2015 41st Annual Northeast Biomedical Engineering Conference, NEBEC 2015 - Troy, United States
Duration: Apr 17 2015Apr 19 2015

Publication series

Name2015 41st Annual Northeast Biomedical Engineering Conference, NEBEC 2015

Other

Other2015 41st Annual Northeast Biomedical Engineering Conference, NEBEC 2015
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityTroy
Period4/17/154/19/15

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Cancer Research
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Control and Systems Engineering

Keywords

  • biomechanics
  • computed muscle control
  • elbow injury
  • joint simulation

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