Increasing the antinociceptive effect of ingested glycinamide in female rats by increasing its palatability

Porfirio Gómora-Arrati, Oscar González-Flores, Julio César Morales-Medina, Barry Komisaruk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: These studies were undertaken to investigate whether the ingestion of glycinamide, a precursor of glycine, made more palatable by mixing with a chocolate suspension, improves antinociception in rats. Methods: Two nociception threshold models were employed: the tail-flick latency and vocalization to tail shock, in restricted and freely-moving rats. Glycinamide in a highly palatable commercial chocolate aqueous suspension was provided for ad-lib ingestion after 24 hours of water deprivation. Antinociception threshold testing was performed before and 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, and 240 minutes after the ingestion of the chocolate-glycinamide mixture. Results: Ingestion of the glycinamide-in-chocolate suspension induced antinociception based on the tail shock vocalization and tail-flick latency tests. Ingestion of the glycinamide-in-chocolate suspension induced an 80% elevation in the antinociceptive threshold that persisted for 4 hours. Conclusions: Rats readily ingest the glycine precursor, glycinamide, in an aqueous chocolate mixture, which induces potent and prolonged antinociception.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number135314
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume737
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Keywords

  • antinociception
  • chocolate
  • glycinamide ingestion
  • glycine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Increasing the antinociceptive effect of ingested glycinamide in female rats by increasing its palatability'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this