Interspecies prediction of pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of doxorubicin by physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling

Jong Bong Lee, Simon Zhou, Manting Chiang, Xiaowei Zang, Tae Hwan Kim, Leonid Kagan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of the study was to develop a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe and predict whole-body disposition of doxorubicin following intravenous administration. The PBPK model was established using previously published data in mice and included 10 tissue compartments: lungs, heart, brain, muscle, kidneys, pancreas, intestine, liver, spleen, adipose tissue, and plasma. Individual tissues were described by either perfusion-limited or permeability-limited models. All parameters were simultaneously estimated and the final model was able to describe murine data with good precision. The model was used for predicting doxorubicin disposition in rats, rabbits, dogs, and humans using interspecies scaling approaches and was qualified using plasma and tissue observed data. Reasonable prediction of the plasma pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution was achieved across all species. In conclusion, the PBPK model developed based on a rich dataset obtained from mice, was able to reasonably predict the disposition of doxorubicin in other preclinical species and humans. Applicability of the model for special populations, such as patients with hepatic impairment, was also demonstrated. The proposed model will be a valuable tool for optimization of exposure profiles of doxorubicin in human patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)192-205
Number of pages14
JournalBiopharmaceutics and Drug Disposition
Volume41
Issue number4-5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2020
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Keywords

  • allometric scaling
  • doxorubicin disposition
  • model validation
  • pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation
  • pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic

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