It seems factual, but is it? Effects of using sharp versus round numbers in advertising claims

Robert M. Schindler, Richard F. Yalch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper compares sharp versus round numbers in advertising claims. Round numbers have a salient conceptual basis (e.g., 10 years are a decade). Sharp numbers do not (e.g., 11 years). Estimates tend to be expressed with round numbers. An experiment is described that examines whether consumers make the false assumption that claims using sharp numbers are less likely to be estimates (i.e., are more factual) than those using round numbers and, if so, whether this makes sharp-number claims more believable. The results demonstrate that such assumptions do occur, even for those consumers considered to be advertising skeptics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)586-590
Number of pages5
JournalAdvances in Consumer Research
Volume33
StatePublished - 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Marketing

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