Latino residential segregation and self-rated health among Latinos: Washington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2012-2014

Jesse Plascak, Yamile Molina, Samantha Wu-Georges, Ayah Idris, Beti Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship between Latino residential segregation and self-rated health (SRH) is unclear, but might be partially affected by social capital. We investigated the association between Latino residential segregation and SRH while also examining the roles of various social capital measures. Washington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2012-2014) and U.S. Census data were linked by zip code and zip code tabulation area. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to estimate odds of good or better SRH by Latino residential segregation, measured by the Gini coefficient, and controlling for sociodemographic, acculturation and social capital measures of neighborhood ties, collective socialization of children, and social control. The Latino residential segregation - SRH relationship was convex, or 'U'-shaped, such that increases in segregation among Latinos residing in lower segregation areas was associated with lower SRH while increases in segregation among Latinos residing in higher segregation areas was associated with higher SRH. The social capital measures were independently associated with SRH but had little effect on the relationship between Latino residential segregation and SRH. A convex relationship between Latino residential segregation and SRH could explain mixed findings of previous studies. Although important for SRH, social capital measures of neighborhood ties, collective socialization of children, and social control might not account for the relationship between Latino residential segregation and SRH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-47
Number of pages10
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume159
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Fingerprint

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Hispanic Americans
segregation
surveillance
Health
health
social capital
Socialization
social control
socialization
Latinos
Surveillance
Residential Segregation
Risk Factors
Logistic Models
Acculturation
Censuses
acculturation
census

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Keywords

  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
  • Latino residential segregation
  • Self-rated general health
  • Social capital

Cite this

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title = "Latino residential segregation and self-rated health among Latinos: Washington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2012-2014",
abstract = "The relationship between Latino residential segregation and self-rated health (SRH) is unclear, but might be partially affected by social capital. We investigated the association between Latino residential segregation and SRH while also examining the roles of various social capital measures. Washington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2012-2014) and U.S. Census data were linked by zip code and zip code tabulation area. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to estimate odds of good or better SRH by Latino residential segregation, measured by the Gini coefficient, and controlling for sociodemographic, acculturation and social capital measures of neighborhood ties, collective socialization of children, and social control. The Latino residential segregation - SRH relationship was convex, or 'U'-shaped, such that increases in segregation among Latinos residing in lower segregation areas was associated with lower SRH while increases in segregation among Latinos residing in higher segregation areas was associated with higher SRH. The social capital measures were independently associated with SRH but had little effect on the relationship between Latino residential segregation and SRH. A convex relationship between Latino residential segregation and SRH could explain mixed findings of previous studies. Although important for SRH, social capital measures of neighborhood ties, collective socialization of children, and social control might not account for the relationship between Latino residential segregation and SRH.",
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Latino residential segregation and self-rated health among Latinos : Washington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2012-2014. / Plascak, Jesse; Molina, Yamile; Wu-Georges, Samantha; Idris, Ayah; Thompson, Beti.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 159, 01.06.2016, p. 38-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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