Least tern populations in coastal New Jersey

monitoring and management of a regionally-endangered species

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sterna antillarum is endangered in New Jersey and New York and is being considered for the US Federal List as threatened along the Atlantic Coast. Like many coastal, ground-nesting species, it has suffered habitat losses, increased predation, and increased human disturbance with increased human population. This paper presents an overview of 10 yr of monitoring and managing of least terns in New Jersey. The program involves monitoring population levels and reproductive success, protecting colonies from people and predators, manipulating vegetation and habitat, and actively attracting least terns with decoys. In successive years a trend has indicated increased population levels, and reproductive success, and decreased and then increased number of colonies. -from Author

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)801-811
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Coastal Research
Volume5
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

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endangered species
reproductive success
habitat loss
monitoring
predation
predator
disturbance
vegetation
coast
habitat
programme
human population
trend

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Earth-Surface Processes

Cite this

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Least tern populations in coastal New Jersey : monitoring and management of a regionally-endangered species. / Burger, Joanna.

In: Journal of Coastal Research, Vol. 5, No. 4, 01.01.1989, p. 801-811.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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