Long and short routes to success in electronically mediated negotiations: Group affiliations and good vibrations

Don A. Moore, Terri R. Kurtzberg, Leigh L. Thompson, Michael W. Morris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

184 Scopus citations

Abstract

To understand why e-mail negotiations break down, we investigated two distinct elements of negotiators' relationships with each other: shared membership in a social group and mutual self-disclosure. In an experiment, some participants negotiated with a member of an outgroup (a student at a competitor university), whereas others negotiated with a member of an ingroup (a student at the same university). In addition, some negotiators exchanged personal information with their counterparts, whereas others did not. When neither common ingroup status nor a personalized relationship existed between negotiators, negotiations were more likely to end in impasse. These results are attributable to the positive influence of mutual self-disclosure and common group membership on negotiation processes and rapport between negotiators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-43
Number of pages22
JournalOrganizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
Volume77
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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