LONGITUDINAL PREDICTORS OF SERIOUS SUBSTANCE USE AND DELINQUENCY

HELENE RASKIN WHITE, ROBERT J. PANDINA, RANDY L. LaGRANGE

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

117 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study tests the validity of a common‐cause model in explaining both serious substance use and serious delinquent behavior among youths. Longitudinal data on 441 male and 441 female adolescents are analyzed. Youths originally tested at Time 1 when they were 12, 15, or 18 years old were retested three years later when they were 15, 18, or 21 years old. The results provide modest support for a common‐cause model. While a number of predictor variables drawn from control theory and differential association theory are related to both behaviors, those drawn from the literature on psychological correlates of adolescent deviance tend to be more strongly related to subsequent serious substance use than to serious delinquency. The findings suggest that there is a degree of etiological independence in serious adolescent substance use and serious forms of delinquency. The implications of these results for theory development and policy implementation are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)715-740
Number of pages26
JournalCriminology
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1987

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

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