Male germline transmits fetal alcohol epigenetic marks for multiple generations

A review

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Alcohol exposure during fetal and early postnatal development can lead to an increased incidence of later life adult-onset diseases. Examples include central nervous system dysfunction, depression, anxiety, hyperactivity, and an inability to deal with stressful situations, increased infection and cancer. Direct effects of alcohol leading to developmental abnormalities often involve epigenetic modifications of genes that regulate cellular functions. Epigenetic marks carried over from the parents are known to undergo molecular programming events that happen early in embryonic development by a wave of DNA demethylation, which leaves the embryo with a fresh genomic composition. The proopiomelanocortin (Pomc) gene controls neuroendocrine-immune functions and is imprinted by fetal alcohol exposure. Recently, this gene has been shown to be hypermethylated through three generations. Additionally, the alcohol epigenetic marks on the Pomc gene are maintained in the male but not in the female germline during this transgenerational transmission. These data suggest that the male-specific chromosome might be involved in transmitting alcohol epigenetic marks through multiple generations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-34
Number of pages12
JournalAddiction Biology
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Epigenomics
Alcohols
Pro-Opiomelanocortin
Genes
Embryonic Development
Embryonic Structures
Anxiety
Central Nervous System
Chromosomes
Depression
DNA
Incidence
Infection
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Keywords

  • DNA methylation
  • fetal alcohol
  • male germline
  • proopiomelanocortin
  • stress hormone
  • transgenerational epigenetic

Cite this

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title = "Male germline transmits fetal alcohol epigenetic marks for multiple generations: A review",
abstract = "Alcohol exposure during fetal and early postnatal development can lead to an increased incidence of later life adult-onset diseases. Examples include central nervous system dysfunction, depression, anxiety, hyperactivity, and an inability to deal with stressful situations, increased infection and cancer. Direct effects of alcohol leading to developmental abnormalities often involve epigenetic modifications of genes that regulate cellular functions. Epigenetic marks carried over from the parents are known to undergo molecular programming events that happen early in embryonic development by a wave of DNA demethylation, which leaves the embryo with a fresh genomic composition. The proopiomelanocortin (Pomc) gene controls neuroendocrine-immune functions and is imprinted by fetal alcohol exposure. Recently, this gene has been shown to be hypermethylated through three generations. Additionally, the alcohol epigenetic marks on the Pomc gene are maintained in the male but not in the female germline during this transgenerational transmission. These data suggest that the male-specific chromosome might be involved in transmitting alcohol epigenetic marks through multiple generations.",
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Male germline transmits fetal alcohol epigenetic marks for multiple generations : A review. / Sarkar, Dipak.

In: Addiction Biology, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 23-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Male germline transmits fetal alcohol epigenetic marks for multiple generations

T2 - A review

AU - Sarkar, Dipak

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Alcohol exposure during fetal and early postnatal development can lead to an increased incidence of later life adult-onset diseases. Examples include central nervous system dysfunction, depression, anxiety, hyperactivity, and an inability to deal with stressful situations, increased infection and cancer. Direct effects of alcohol leading to developmental abnormalities often involve epigenetic modifications of genes that regulate cellular functions. Epigenetic marks carried over from the parents are known to undergo molecular programming events that happen early in embryonic development by a wave of DNA demethylation, which leaves the embryo with a fresh genomic composition. The proopiomelanocortin (Pomc) gene controls neuroendocrine-immune functions and is imprinted by fetal alcohol exposure. Recently, this gene has been shown to be hypermethylated through three generations. Additionally, the alcohol epigenetic marks on the Pomc gene are maintained in the male but not in the female germline during this transgenerational transmission. These data suggest that the male-specific chromosome might be involved in transmitting alcohol epigenetic marks through multiple generations.

AB - Alcohol exposure during fetal and early postnatal development can lead to an increased incidence of later life adult-onset diseases. Examples include central nervous system dysfunction, depression, anxiety, hyperactivity, and an inability to deal with stressful situations, increased infection and cancer. Direct effects of alcohol leading to developmental abnormalities often involve epigenetic modifications of genes that regulate cellular functions. Epigenetic marks carried over from the parents are known to undergo molecular programming events that happen early in embryonic development by a wave of DNA demethylation, which leaves the embryo with a fresh genomic composition. The proopiomelanocortin (Pomc) gene controls neuroendocrine-immune functions and is imprinted by fetal alcohol exposure. Recently, this gene has been shown to be hypermethylated through three generations. Additionally, the alcohol epigenetic marks on the Pomc gene are maintained in the male but not in the female germline during this transgenerational transmission. These data suggest that the male-specific chromosome might be involved in transmitting alcohol epigenetic marks through multiple generations.

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KW - stress hormone

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