Managing ethnic diversity after 9/11: Integration, security, and civil liberties in transatlantic perspective

Research output: Book/ReportBook

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

America's approach to terrorism has focused on traditional national security methods, under the assumption that terrorism's roots are foreign and the solution to greater security lies in conventional practices. Europe offers a different model, with its response to internal terrorism relying on police procedures. Managing Ethnic Diversity after 9/11 compares these two strategies and considers that both may have engendered greater radicalization-and a greater chance of home-grown terrorism. Essays address how transatlantic countries, including the United Kingdom, the United States, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, and the Netherlands have integrated ethnic minorities, especially Arabs and Muslims, since 9/11. Discussing the "securitization of integration," contributors argue that the neglect of civil integration has challenged the rights of these minorities and has made greater security more remote.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherRutgers University Press
Number of pages301
ISBN (Print)9780813547169
StatePublished - 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

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