Markers of endothelial dysfunction and inflammation predict progression of diabetic nephropathy in African Americans with type 1 diabetes

Monique S. Roy, Malvin N. Janal, Juan Crosby, Robert Donnelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

African Americans with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus are at a high risk for severe diabetic nephropathy and end-stage renal disease. In order to determine whether baseline plasma levels of inflammatory markers predict incidence of overt proteinuria or renal failure in African Americans with type 1 diabetes mellitus, we re-examined data of 356 participants in our observational follow-up study of 725 New Jersey African Americans with type 1 diabetes. At baseline and 6-year follow-up, a detailed structured clinical interview was conducted to document medical history including kidney dialysis or transplant, other diabetic complications, and renal-specific mortality. Plasma levels of 28 inflammatory biomarkers were measured using a multiplex bead analysis system. After adjusting for baseline age, glycohemoglobin, and other confounders, the baseline plasma levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) in the upper two quartiles were, respectively, associated with a three- to fivefold increase in the risk of progression from no albuminuria or microalbuminuria to overt proteinuria. Baseline plasma levels of the chemokine eotaxin in the upper quartile were significantly associated with a sevenfold increase in risk of incident renal failure. These associations were independent of traditional risk factors for progression of diabetic nephropathy. Thus, in type 1 diabetic African Americans, sICAM-1 predicted progression to overt proteinuria and eotaxin-predicted progression to renal failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-433
Number of pages7
JournalKidney International
Volume87
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 3 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nephrology

Keywords

  • chemokine
  • chronic kidney disease
  • chronic renal failure
  • cytokines
  • diabetes mellitus
  • diabetic nephropathy

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