Mechanisms and strategies for improving drought resistance in turfgrass

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Drought stress is one of the most detrimental factors limiting turfgrass growth. There exists large variability in drought resistance among turfgrass species and cultivars. Understanding genetic variations in drought resistance among turfgrasses is important for selecting turfgrasses adapt to water-limiting environments. Turfgrasses have developed three major drought-resistance strategies in their adaptation to drought stress, including drought tolerance, drought avoidance, and drought escape. These strategies are genetically controlled by various physiological and biochemical characteristics. Deep rooting is a critical factor for turfgrass to maintain cellular hydration by avoiding water deficit. Osmotic adjustment is important for plants to tolerate drought stress when water deficit develops in plants. These traits could be selected through breeding, and also can be modified by culture practices. Understanding drought-resistance traits will facilitate the development of drought-resistance turfgrasses and efficient management practices for areas with limited water resources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Second International Conference on Turfgrass Science and Management for Sports Fields
EditorsJ.C. Stier, Liebao Han, Deying Li
Pages221-227
Number of pages7
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2008

Publication series

NameActa Horticulturae
Volume783
ISSN (Print)0567-7572

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Horticulture

Keywords

  • Cool-season grass
  • Evapotranspiration rate
  • Warm-season grass
  • Water conservation

Cite this

Huang, B. (2008). Mechanisms and strategies for improving drought resistance in turfgrass. In J. C. Stier, L. Han, & D. Li (Eds.), Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Turfgrass Science and Management for Sports Fields (pp. 221-227). (Acta Horticulturae; Vol. 783).