Mechanisms of ciprofloxacin removal by nano-sized magnetite

Sudipta Rakshit, Dibyendu Sarkar, Evert Elzinga, Pravin Punamiya, Rupali Datta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An understanding of the interaction mechanisms of antibiotics with environmentally relevant sorbents is important to determine the environmental fate of antibiotics and to develop wastewater treatment strategies. Magnetite (Fe3O4(s)) is ubiquitous in the environment and occurs as a secondary corrosion product of iron nanoparticles that are commonly used as a remediation material. In this study, we aimed to assess the sorption mechanisms of ciprofloxacin (CIP), an important class of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, with magnetite nanoparticles using a combination of wet chemical and in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopic measurements. Ciprofloxacin sorption was characterized as a function of pH (3.4-8.0), CIP concentration (1-500μM), ionic strength (0.5, 0.1, and 0.01M NaCl), and competing anion such as phosphate (0.1mM) to cover a broad range of environmentally relevant geochemical conditions. Results indicated a bell-shaped sorption envelop where sorption of CIP on nano-Fe3O4(s) increased from 45% to 80% at pH 3.44-5.97; beyond that sorption gradually decreased to a value of 25% at pH 8.39. Phosphate had negligible effect on CIP sorption. In situ ATR-FTIR results indicated inner-sphere coordination of CIP at the magnetite surface mediated by carboxylic acid groups. Results suggest that nano-Fe3O4(s) has the potential to remove CIP from wastewater effectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-226
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Hazardous Materials
Volume246-247
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 5 2013

Fingerprint

Ferrosoferric Oxide
Magnetite
Ciprofloxacin
Sorption
magnetite
sorption
Antibiotics
antibiotics
Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy
Waste Water
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Phosphates
phosphate
Magnetite Nanoparticles
Magnetite nanoparticles
environmental fate
carboxylic acid
Sorbents
Ionic strength
Corrosion

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Keywords

  • Ciprofloxacin
  • In situ ATR-FTIR
  • Magnetite
  • Sorption

Cite this

Rakshit, Sudipta ; Sarkar, Dibyendu ; Elzinga, Evert ; Punamiya, Pravin ; Datta, Rupali. / Mechanisms of ciprofloxacin removal by nano-sized magnetite. In: Journal of Hazardous Materials. 2013 ; Vol. 246-247. pp. 221-226.
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Mechanisms of ciprofloxacin removal by nano-sized magnetite. / Rakshit, Sudipta; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Elzinga, Evert; Punamiya, Pravin; Datta, Rupali.

In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, Vol. 246-247, 05.02.2013, p. 221-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Mechanisms of ciprofloxacin removal by nano-sized magnetite

AU - Rakshit, Sudipta

AU - Sarkar, Dibyendu

AU - Elzinga, Evert

AU - Punamiya, Pravin

AU - Datta, Rupali

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AB - An understanding of the interaction mechanisms of antibiotics with environmentally relevant sorbents is important to determine the environmental fate of antibiotics and to develop wastewater treatment strategies. Magnetite (Fe3O4(s)) is ubiquitous in the environment and occurs as a secondary corrosion product of iron nanoparticles that are commonly used as a remediation material. In this study, we aimed to assess the sorption mechanisms of ciprofloxacin (CIP), an important class of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, with magnetite nanoparticles using a combination of wet chemical and in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopic measurements. Ciprofloxacin sorption was characterized as a function of pH (3.4-8.0), CIP concentration (1-500μM), ionic strength (0.5, 0.1, and 0.01M NaCl), and competing anion such as phosphate (0.1mM) to cover a broad range of environmentally relevant geochemical conditions. Results indicated a bell-shaped sorption envelop where sorption of CIP on nano-Fe3O4(s) increased from 45% to 80% at pH 3.44-5.97; beyond that sorption gradually decreased to a value of 25% at pH 8.39. Phosphate had negligible effect on CIP sorption. In situ ATR-FTIR results indicated inner-sphere coordination of CIP at the magnetite surface mediated by carboxylic acid groups. Results suggest that nano-Fe3O4(s) has the potential to remove CIP from wastewater effectively.

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