Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of statins in decreasing cardiovascular events in women and men. Background: Published data reviews have suggested that statins might not be as effective in women as in men in decreasing cardiovascular events. Methods: Published data searches and contacts with investigators identified 18 randomized clinical trials of statins with sex-specific outcomes (N = 141,235, 40,275 women, 21,468 cardiovascular events). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for cardiovascular events were calculated for women and men separately with random effects meta-analyses. Results: The cardiovascular event rate was lower among those randomized to statin intervention than in those randomized to control (low-dose statin in 4 studies, placebo in 11 studies, usual care in 3 studies) and similar in women and men (OR: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.75 to 0.89; p < 0.0001, and OR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.71 to 0.83, p < 0.0001, respectively). The benefit of statins was statistically significant in both sexes, regardless of the type of control, baseline risk, or type of endpoint and in both primary and secondary prevention. All-cause mortality was also lower with statin therapy both in women and men without significant interaction by sex (p for interaction = 0.4457). Conclusions: Statin therapy is associated with significant decreases in cardiovascular events and in all-cause mortality in women and men. Statin therapy should be used in appropriate patients without regard to sex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)572-582
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume59
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 7 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Keywords

  • LDL
  • cardiovascular disease
  • lipids
  • statins
  • women

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