Methamphetamine and poly-substance use among gym-attending men who have sex with men in New York City

Perry Halkitis, Robert W. Moeller, Daniel E. Siconolfi, Roy C. Jerome, Meighan Rogers, Julia Schillinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Methamphetamine and other drug use has been documented among men who have sex with men (MSM). Patterns of use may be influenced by point of recruitment into these studies. Purpose: The aim of this study is to describe patterns of methamphetamine and other drug use and to delineate psychosocial and demographic factors which accompany these patterns of use in a sample of MSM attending gyms in New York City. Methods: Active recruitment strategies were implemented to ascertain a sample of 311 MSM. Participants completed a one-time survey regarding both health risks and health promotion. Results: Methamphetamine use in the last 6 months was reported by 23.8% of men. Inhalation and smoking were the most common modes of administration, and 84% of men reported more than one mode of use. Study participants also indicated a variety of other substances used, including but not limited to alcohol, inhalant nitrates, and 3,4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Compared to nonusers, methamphetamine users were more likely to report being black or Latino, depressed, HIV-positive, perceiving more benefits of unprotected sex, and understanding masculinity in sexual terms. Conclusions: These data suggest that health-risk behaviors are common among MSM who are regularly using a gym and are indicative of the complexities of health issues for this segment of the population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-48
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Methamphetamine
Health
Unsafe Sex
N-Methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine
Masculinity
Risk-Taking
Health Promotion
Hispanic Americans
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Nitrates
Inhalation
Smoking
Alcohols
Demography
HIV
Psychology
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Halkitis, Perry ; Moeller, Robert W. ; Siconolfi, Daniel E. ; Jerome, Roy C. ; Rogers, Meighan ; Schillinger, Julia. / Methamphetamine and poly-substance use among gym-attending men who have sex with men in New York City. In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 41-48.
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Methamphetamine and poly-substance use among gym-attending men who have sex with men in New York City. / Halkitis, Perry; Moeller, Robert W.; Siconolfi, Daniel E.; Jerome, Roy C.; Rogers, Meighan; Schillinger, Julia.

In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.02.2008, p. 41-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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