Microscopic photoemissive probing of doped regions on semiconductor surfaces

B. Quiniou, R. Scarmozzino, Z. Wu, R. M. Osgood

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The use of photoemission for microscopic probing of the material characteristics of a semiconductor surface is demonstrated. A focused UV laser beam is scanned across a patterned semiconductor, and differences in surface properties such as doping or oxide/metal deposits are observed as differences in emitted photocurrent. The experimental setup is described, and measurements on Si (100) surfaces are reported. Measurements of photoelectric yield versus laser power exhibited a linear dependence on power, indicating that single photon photoemission is the dominant effect observed in these experiments. A typical trace of the photocurrent versus time for a stationary laser spot on the weakly doped p-type silicon region is shown. On steady illumination, a photocurrent is measured which subsequently rises, reaches a maximum, and then decays to a nearly steady-state value. This phenomenon is believed to be the result of adsorbed gases, probably water vapor. Plots of photocurrent versus time obtained while scanning the beam across the p+-on-p and n+-on-p samples are also shown and discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCONFERENCE ON LASERS AND ELECTRO-0PTICS
Editors Anon
PublisherPubl by IEEE
Pages430-431
Number of pages2
ISBN (Print)1557520860
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes
EventSummaries of Papers Presented at the Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics - Baltimore, MD, USA
Duration: Apr 24 1989Apr 28 1989

Publication series

NameCONFERENCE ON LASERS AND ELECTRO-0PTICS

Other

OtherSummaries of Papers Presented at the Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics
CityBaltimore, MD, USA
Period4/24/894/28/89

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

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