Molecular mechanisms of painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy—Evidence from animal research and clinical correlates

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Abstract

Painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy (PTTN) may occur following major craniofacial or oral trauma, or may be subsequent to relatively minor dental interventions. Following injury, pain may originate from a peripheral nerve, a ganglion, or from the central nervous system. In this review, we focus on molecular mechanisms of pain resulting from injury to the peripheral branch of the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy (PTTN) by the International Headache Society and replaces previous terms including atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy and phantom toothache. We emphasize the scientific evidence supporting the events purported to lead to PTTN by reviewing the pathophysiology of PTTN based on relevant animal models. Additionally, we briefly overview clinical correlates and pathophysiological manifestations of PTTN.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)580-589
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Oral Pathology and Medicine
Volume49
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Cancer Research
  • Periodontics

Keywords

  • neuropathic pain
  • painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy
  • pathophysiology
  • trauma

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