Motion analysis of the right ventricle from MRI images

Edith Haber, Dimitris N. Metaxas, Leon Axel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Both normal and abnormal right ventricular (RV) wall motion is not well understood. In this paper, we use data from tagged MRI images to perform the first 3D motion study of the entire right ventricle to date. Our technique is an adaptation of a physics-based deformable modeling methodology that was successfully used on the left ventricle(LV). As opposed to the previous approach, currently we use segmented contours to generate the geometry, ID tags for our input data (due to the thinner RV), and localized degrees of freedom (DOFs) with finite elements. Although we build a biventricular model, our results focus on method validation and visualizing clinically useful parameters that describe RV wall motion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention ─ MICCAI 1998 - 1st International Conference, Proceedings
EditorsWilliam M. Wells, Alan Colchester, Scott Delp
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages177-188
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)3540651365, 9783540651369
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes
Event1st International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 1998 - Cambridge, United States
Duration: Oct 11 1998Oct 13 1998

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume1496
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

Other1st International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 1998
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityCambridge
Period10/11/9810/13/98

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

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