Neighborhood social cohesion and cognitive function in U.S. Chinese older adults—findings from the PINE study

Wei Zhang, Sizhe Liu, Fei Sun, Xin Qi Dong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The projected increase in the population of older adults in the United States entails a pressing need to examine risk and protective factors associated with cognitive function. This study aims to examine the association between neighborhood social cohesion and cognitive function among older Chinese adults in the United States. Method: Using the first epidemiological survey of older Chinese Americans and applying ordinary least squares and quantile regressions, this study examines the association between neighborhood social cohesion and various domains of cognitive function. Results: Results show that neighborhood social cohesion is independently associated with most domains of cognitive function (i.e. global cognition score, and its components such as the Chinese Mini-Mental State Examination and executive function and episodic memory measures). Conclusion: This study represents one of a few initial efforts that examined the association between neighborhood social cohesion and cognitive function for Chinese older adults in the United States. Our findings suggest that socially cohesive neighborhoods can provide enriched environments where active lifestyles can be encouraged, and cognitive skills and abilities can be stimulated, practiced, and preserved for older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1113-1121
Number of pages9
JournalAging and Mental Health
Volume23
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Keywords

  • Chinese older adults
  • cognitive function
  • neighborhood social cohesion

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