Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily Regulate Synapse Formation, Maintenance, and Function

Vladimir Sytnyk, Iryna Leshchyns'ka, Melitta Camartin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

70 Scopus citations

Abstract

Immunoglobulin superfamily adhesion molecules are among the most abundant proteins in vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. Prominent family members are the neural cell adhesion molecules NCAM and L1, which were the first to be shown to be essential not only in development but also in synaptic function and as key regulators of synapse formation, synaptic activity, plasticity, and synaptic vesicle recycling at distinct developmental and activity stages. In addition to interacting with each other, adhesion molecules interact with ion channels and cytokine and neurotransmitter receptors. Mutations in their genes are linked to neurological disorders associated with abnormal development and synaptic functioning. This review presents an overview of recent studies on these molecules and their crucial impact on neurological disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)295-308
Number of pages14
JournalTrends in Neurosciences
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Keywords

  • learning
  • memory
  • neural cell adhesion molecules
  • synapse
  • synaptic plasticity

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