Newly found Jews and the politics of recognition

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the latter half of the twentieth century, tribal groups throughout Africa and Asia who regard themselves as Jews, such as the Abayudaya of South Africa and the Mizo of northern India and Burma, sought the recognition of their Jewishness by established Jewish communities in Israel and the United States. This process of recognition reflects different understandings of Jewish identity and different political agendas among the various Jewish groups who have become involved with advocacy for "newly found" Jews. For Israeli Jewish organizations, recognition is based on a more essentialist view of Jewishness and is oriented toward socializing "newly found" Jews toward Orthodox Judaism and preparation for immigration to Israel. Newer American Jewish organizations reflect greater denominational diversity and a more postmodern understanding of Jewishness as fluid and open-ended. They treat recognition as part of a commitment to Jewish diversity and multiculturalism, with less attention to traditional normative definitions of Jewish identity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)387-410
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Religion
Volume80
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Religious studies

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Newly found Jews and the politics of recognition'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this