Novel RNA Restriction Enzymes

Masayori Inouye (Inventor), Yoshihiro Yamaguchi (Inventor)

Research output: Innovation

Abstract

List of RNA Restriction Enzymes


Invention Summary:

Restriction enzymes for DNA have been well elucidated and enabled in-vitro DNA manipulation. Its significant impact on genetic engineering have led to the recent revolution in biotechnology. Several attempts towards engineering methods for specific RNA cleavage such as Ribozymes, PNAzymes and RNAse H have been developed over the years. However, each of them has some limitations such as:  low turnover rates and high production cost. Hence, there is still an unmet need for enzymes that cleave mRNAs at specific sequences, or “RNA Restriction Enzymes”.

Rutgers scientists have identified and characterized 14 enzymes which recognize specific 3-, 4-, 5- and 7-base RNA sequences and cleave them at specific sites (as shown in the table in the top right corner). These RNA restriction enzymes are mRNA endoribonuclease, which are derived from a variety of bacteria. For example, the MazF-hw recognizes and cleaves the seven-base sequence UU^ACUCA. Further, these enzymes may be engineered to alter the RNA cleavage specificity to generate an array of new RNA restriction enzymes.

These RNA restriction enzymes can be a valuable research tool, both for in vitro manipulation of mRNAs or in vivo gene silencing.  It also has the potential to be applicable to a wide range of hosts, including human, animal, plant, yeast, and bacterial cells for biomedical research, agricultural and industrial use. It may also have important implications on emerging genetic engineering trends in the future.

Market Applications:

  • In vitro RNA manipulation
  • In vivo gene silencing

Advantages:

  • Highly specific mRNA recognition and cleavage
  • Can be applied to a range of fields for biomedical research, agricultural and industrial purposes
  • Can be easily and inexpensively produced in E. coli

Intellectual Property & Development Status:

One patent has been issued. Available for licensing and research collaboration

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Fingerprint

RNA
Enzymes
RNA Cleavage
Messenger RNA
Genetic Engineering
Gene Silencing
Biomedical Research
Endoribonucleases
Intellectual Property
Catalytic RNA
Host Specificity
DNA Restriction Enzymes
Licensure
Biotechnology
Research
Yeasts
Escherichia coli
Bacteria
Costs and Cost Analysis
DNA

Keywords

  • Research Tool

Cite this

Inouye, M., & Yamaguchi, Y. (2014). Novel RNA Restriction Enzymes.
Inouye, Masayori (Inventor) ; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro (Inventor). / Novel RNA Restriction Enzymes.
@misc{a281bc55a9934e0b90a864c03c32b239,
title = "Novel RNA Restriction Enzymes",
abstract = "List of RNA Restriction Enzymes Invention Summary: Restriction enzymes for DNA have been well elucidated and enabled in-vitro DNA manipulation. Its significant impact on genetic engineering have led to the recent revolution in biotechnology. Several attempts towards engineering methods for specific RNA cleavage such as Ribozymes, PNAzymes and RNAse H have been developed over the years. However, each of them has some limitations such as:  low turnover rates and high production cost. Hence, there is still an unmet need for enzymes that cleave mRNAs at specific sequences, or “RNA Restriction Enzymes”. Rutgers scientists have identified and characterized 14 enzymes which recognize specific 3-, 4-, 5- and 7-base RNA sequences and cleave them at specific sites (as shown in the table in the top right corner). These RNA restriction enzymes are mRNA endoribonuclease, which are derived from a variety of bacteria. For example, the MazF-hw recognizes and cleaves the seven-base sequence UU^ACUCA. Further, these enzymes may be engineered to alter the RNA cleavage specificity to generate an array of new RNA restriction enzymes. These RNA restriction enzymes can be a valuable research tool, both for in vitro manipulation of mRNAs or in vivo gene silencing.  It also has the potential to be applicable to a wide range of hosts, including human, animal, plant, yeast, and bacterial cells for biomedical research, agricultural and industrial use. It may also have important implications on emerging genetic engineering trends in the future. Market Applications: In vitro RNA manipulation In vivo gene silencing Advantages: Highly specific mRNA recognition and cleavage Can be applied to a range of fields for biomedical research, agricultural and industrial purposes Can be easily and inexpensively produced in E. coli Intellectual Property & Development Status: One patent has been issued. Available for licensing and research collaboration",
keywords = "Research Tool",
author = "Masayori Inouye and Yoshihiro Yamaguchi",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
language = "English (US)",
type = "Patent",

}

Novel RNA Restriction Enzymes. / Inouye, Masayori (Inventor); Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro (Inventor).

Research output: Innovation

TY - PAT

T1 - Novel RNA Restriction Enzymes

AU - Inouye, Masayori

AU - Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro

PY - 2014/1

Y1 - 2014/1

N2 - List of RNA Restriction Enzymes Invention Summary: Restriction enzymes for DNA have been well elucidated and enabled in-vitro DNA manipulation. Its significant impact on genetic engineering have led to the recent revolution in biotechnology. Several attempts towards engineering methods for specific RNA cleavage such as Ribozymes, PNAzymes and RNAse H have been developed over the years. However, each of them has some limitations such as:  low turnover rates and high production cost. Hence, there is still an unmet need for enzymes that cleave mRNAs at specific sequences, or “RNA Restriction Enzymes”. Rutgers scientists have identified and characterized 14 enzymes which recognize specific 3-, 4-, 5- and 7-base RNA sequences and cleave them at specific sites (as shown in the table in the top right corner). These RNA restriction enzymes are mRNA endoribonuclease, which are derived from a variety of bacteria. For example, the MazF-hw recognizes and cleaves the seven-base sequence UU^ACUCA. Further, these enzymes may be engineered to alter the RNA cleavage specificity to generate an array of new RNA restriction enzymes. These RNA restriction enzymes can be a valuable research tool, both for in vitro manipulation of mRNAs or in vivo gene silencing.  It also has the potential to be applicable to a wide range of hosts, including human, animal, plant, yeast, and bacterial cells for biomedical research, agricultural and industrial use. It may also have important implications on emerging genetic engineering trends in the future. Market Applications: In vitro RNA manipulation In vivo gene silencing Advantages: Highly specific mRNA recognition and cleavage Can be applied to a range of fields for biomedical research, agricultural and industrial purposes Can be easily and inexpensively produced in E. coli Intellectual Property & Development Status: One patent has been issued. Available for licensing and research collaboration

AB - List of RNA Restriction Enzymes Invention Summary: Restriction enzymes for DNA have been well elucidated and enabled in-vitro DNA manipulation. Its significant impact on genetic engineering have led to the recent revolution in biotechnology. Several attempts towards engineering methods for specific RNA cleavage such as Ribozymes, PNAzymes and RNAse H have been developed over the years. However, each of them has some limitations such as:  low turnover rates and high production cost. Hence, there is still an unmet need for enzymes that cleave mRNAs at specific sequences, or “RNA Restriction Enzymes”. Rutgers scientists have identified and characterized 14 enzymes which recognize specific 3-, 4-, 5- and 7-base RNA sequences and cleave them at specific sites (as shown in the table in the top right corner). These RNA restriction enzymes are mRNA endoribonuclease, which are derived from a variety of bacteria. For example, the MazF-hw recognizes and cleaves the seven-base sequence UU^ACUCA. Further, these enzymes may be engineered to alter the RNA cleavage specificity to generate an array of new RNA restriction enzymes. These RNA restriction enzymes can be a valuable research tool, both for in vitro manipulation of mRNAs or in vivo gene silencing.  It also has the potential to be applicable to a wide range of hosts, including human, animal, plant, yeast, and bacterial cells for biomedical research, agricultural and industrial use. It may also have important implications on emerging genetic engineering trends in the future. Market Applications: In vitro RNA manipulation In vivo gene silencing Advantages: Highly specific mRNA recognition and cleavage Can be applied to a range of fields for biomedical research, agricultural and industrial purposes Can be easily and inexpensively produced in E. coli Intellectual Property & Development Status: One patent has been issued. Available for licensing and research collaboration

KW - Research Tool

UR - http://rutgers.technologypublisher.com/tech/Novel_RNA_Restriction_Enzymes

M3 - Innovation

ER -

Inouye M, Yamaguchi Y, inventors. Novel RNA Restriction Enzymes. 2014 Jan.