Occupation and lung cancer mortality among women: Using occupation to target smoking cessation programs for women

Carol Hogfoss Rubin, Carol A. Burnett, William E. Halperin, Paul J. Seligman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Lung cancer mortality rates are increasing for women, despite the fact that 90% of these deaths could be prevented by smoking cessation. Targeted workplace smoking cessation programs may increase the effectiveness of lung cancer prevention for women. This study uses proportionate mortality ratio analysis of occupationally coded death certificates, from 28 states between 1979 and 1990, to identify occupations in which women are at high risk of lung cancer mortality. The study found gender and racial variation in the results for broad occupational groups. Blue-collar occupations associated with potentially carcinogenic workplace exposures also had elevated proportionate mortality ratios, probably reflecting both occupational and tobacco exposure. For women, specific occupations such as managers and financial officers revealed significant elevations in lung cancer mortality. Cessation programs targeting women in these occupational groups may increase the effectiveness of lung cancer prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1234-1238
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Occupational Medicine
Volume36
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1994
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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