Organosulfur compounds and cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is evidence that organosulfur compounds can inhibit the induction and growth of cancer. Several organosulfur compounds are dietary constituents and Allium species are a rich source of such molecules. Some but not all epidemiological studies have suggested that consumption of garlic can decrease cancer incidence. There is substantial evidence that constituents of garlic including diallyl sulfides can inhibit the induction of cancer in experimental animals. Effects on both tumor initiation and promotion have been documented. Some effects may be mediated by modulation of carcinogen metabolism involving altered ratios of phase I and phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Inhibitory actions on the growth of tumor cells have been documented and, for some tumor cells, differentiating effects of diallyl sulfides can occur. A definitive mechanism of action has not been established and evidence exists for effects at several sites in carcinogen metabolism and regulation of tumor growth. It is not always clear that laboratory studies can be extrapolated to reasonable levels of consumption by humans of garlic or other Allium species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-154
Number of pages8
JournalAdvances in experimental medicine and biology
Volume401
StatePublished - Oct 9 1996

Fingerprint

Tumors
Garlic
Metabolism
Carcinogens
Neoplasms
Allium
Cells
Growth
Animals
Modulation
Molecules
Enzymes
Epidemiologic Studies
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Incidence
allyl sulfide

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

@article{11d19d0afb854a20b591721beb4368e4,
title = "Organosulfur compounds and cancer",
abstract = "There is evidence that organosulfur compounds can inhibit the induction and growth of cancer. Several organosulfur compounds are dietary constituents and Allium species are a rich source of such molecules. Some but not all epidemiological studies have suggested that consumption of garlic can decrease cancer incidence. There is substantial evidence that constituents of garlic including diallyl sulfides can inhibit the induction of cancer in experimental animals. Effects on both tumor initiation and promotion have been documented. Some effects may be mediated by modulation of carcinogen metabolism involving altered ratios of phase I and phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Inhibitory actions on the growth of tumor cells have been documented and, for some tumor cells, differentiating effects of diallyl sulfides can occur. A definitive mechanism of action has not been established and evidence exists for effects at several sites in carcinogen metabolism and regulation of tumor growth. It is not always clear that laboratory studies can be extrapolated to reasonable levels of consumption by humans of garlic or other Allium species.",
author = "Lea, {Michael A.}",
year = "1996",
month = "10",
day = "9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "401",
pages = "147--154",
journal = "Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology",
issn = "0065-2598",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

Organosulfur compounds and cancer. / Lea, Michael A.

In: Advances in experimental medicine and biology, Vol. 401, 09.10.1996, p. 147-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Organosulfur compounds and cancer

AU - Lea, Michael A.

PY - 1996/10/9

Y1 - 1996/10/9

N2 - There is evidence that organosulfur compounds can inhibit the induction and growth of cancer. Several organosulfur compounds are dietary constituents and Allium species are a rich source of such molecules. Some but not all epidemiological studies have suggested that consumption of garlic can decrease cancer incidence. There is substantial evidence that constituents of garlic including diallyl sulfides can inhibit the induction of cancer in experimental animals. Effects on both tumor initiation and promotion have been documented. Some effects may be mediated by modulation of carcinogen metabolism involving altered ratios of phase I and phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Inhibitory actions on the growth of tumor cells have been documented and, for some tumor cells, differentiating effects of diallyl sulfides can occur. A definitive mechanism of action has not been established and evidence exists for effects at several sites in carcinogen metabolism and regulation of tumor growth. It is not always clear that laboratory studies can be extrapolated to reasonable levels of consumption by humans of garlic or other Allium species.

AB - There is evidence that organosulfur compounds can inhibit the induction and growth of cancer. Several organosulfur compounds are dietary constituents and Allium species are a rich source of such molecules. Some but not all epidemiological studies have suggested that consumption of garlic can decrease cancer incidence. There is substantial evidence that constituents of garlic including diallyl sulfides can inhibit the induction of cancer in experimental animals. Effects on both tumor initiation and promotion have been documented. Some effects may be mediated by modulation of carcinogen metabolism involving altered ratios of phase I and phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Inhibitory actions on the growth of tumor cells have been documented and, for some tumor cells, differentiating effects of diallyl sulfides can occur. A definitive mechanism of action has not been established and evidence exists for effects at several sites in carcinogen metabolism and regulation of tumor growth. It is not always clear that laboratory studies can be extrapolated to reasonable levels of consumption by humans of garlic or other Allium species.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029836408&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029836408&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8886133

AN - SCOPUS:0029836408

VL - 401

SP - 147

EP - 154

JO - Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology

JF - Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology

SN - 0065-2598

ER -