Patient awareness of untoward effects of smoking on fetal and maternal well-being during pregnancy: A pilot study

Imelda N. Odibo, Stacy Zamudio, Jasmin M. Young, Everett F. Magann, Shauna Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: To identify knowledge gaps regarding adverse effects of smoking during pregnancy that could be targeted through antenatal education. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey of patients who presented for initial prenatal care from April 6, 2011, through May 25, 2011. Inclusion criteria included fluency in English and completion of at least 75% of the questionnaire. Survey included demographic information and 4 sections that assessed (1) general knowledge about the effects of smoking, (2) cancer risks associated with smoking, (3) maternal and fetal complications resulting from smoking, and (4) long-Term effects of smoking on offspring. Participants were grouped as nonsmokers, former smokers, and current smokers. Data from each group were compared using analysis of variance with Tukey-Kramer post-hoc tests. Results: There were 82 participants (54 nonsmokers, 17 former smokers, and 11 smokers). Self-perceived knowledge about the adverse effects of smoking was significantly less in smokers than in nonsmokers (P < 0.05). There was no statistical difference between the knowledge base of smokers when compared with nonsmokers and former smokers. Smokers seemed to be less aware of the long-Term respiratory morbidity associated with maternal smoking in their offspring. There was an overall deficit in knowledge among all 3 groups of cancer risks associated with smoking other than lung cancer. Conclusions: Obstetrician-gynecologists should employ more aggressive approaches in the education of pregnant parturients about the known deleterious maternal and fetal effects of smoking, especially those risks related to cancers other than lung and long-Term respiratory morbidity in their children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-216
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Addiction Medicine
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

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Smoking
Mothers
Pregnancy
Lung Neoplasms
Prenatal Education
Morbidity
Prenatal Care
Knowledge Bases
Neoplasms
Analysis of Variance
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Parturition
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Odibo, Imelda N. ; Zamudio, Stacy ; Young, Jasmin M. ; Magann, Everett F. ; Williams, Shauna. / Patient awareness of untoward effects of smoking on fetal and maternal well-being during pregnancy : A pilot study. In: Journal of Addiction Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 9, No. 3. pp. 211-216.
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Patient awareness of untoward effects of smoking on fetal and maternal well-being during pregnancy : A pilot study. / Odibo, Imelda N.; Zamudio, Stacy; Young, Jasmin M.; Magann, Everett F.; Williams, Shauna.

In: Journal of Addiction Medicine, Vol. 9, No. 3, 01.05.2015, p. 211-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Introduction: To identify knowledge gaps regarding adverse effects of smoking during pregnancy that could be targeted through antenatal education. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey of patients who presented for initial prenatal care from April 6, 2011, through May 25, 2011. Inclusion criteria included fluency in English and completion of at least 75% of the questionnaire. Survey included demographic information and 4 sections that assessed (1) general knowledge about the effects of smoking, (2) cancer risks associated with smoking, (3) maternal and fetal complications resulting from smoking, and (4) long-Term effects of smoking on offspring. Participants were grouped as nonsmokers, former smokers, and current smokers. Data from each group were compared using analysis of variance with Tukey-Kramer post-hoc tests. Results: There were 82 participants (54 nonsmokers, 17 former smokers, and 11 smokers). Self-perceived knowledge about the adverse effects of smoking was significantly less in smokers than in nonsmokers (P < 0.05). There was no statistical difference between the knowledge base of smokers when compared with nonsmokers and former smokers. Smokers seemed to be less aware of the long-Term respiratory morbidity associated with maternal smoking in their offspring. There was an overall deficit in knowledge among all 3 groups of cancer risks associated with smoking other than lung cancer. Conclusions: Obstetrician-gynecologists should employ more aggressive approaches in the education of pregnant parturients about the known deleterious maternal and fetal effects of smoking, especially those risks related to cancers other than lung and long-Term respiratory morbidity in their children.

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