Patterns in cumulative increase in live and dead species from foraminiferal time series of Cowpen Marsh, Tees Estuary, UK: Implications for sea-level studies

Benjamin Horton, John W. Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have collected live and dead foraminiferal times-series data at 2-weekly intervals for a 12-month period from the intertidal zone of Cowpen Marsh, Tees Estuary, UK. The data from the 689 samples show profound differences between live and dead assemblages, although assemblages are dominated by just three species, Haynesina germanica, Jadammina macrescens and Trochammina inflata, which represent over 70% of the assemblage. The cumulative increase in species of most environments approximates to a lognormal or log series. None of the datasets show a broken stick pattern. The cumulative maximum number of species, which represents the species carrying capacity of the environment, is recorded earlier in the life assemblages than the dead counterparts. The dead assemblage of Cowpen Marsh is found to have a higher abundance (435 compared to 163 individuals/10 cm3) and number of species (52 compared to 28) than its live counterpart because the dead assemblage represents many generations added over a long period of time. In contrast, some species are recorded in the live dataset that were not found in the dead assemblage, indicating the dead record is either incomplete (e.g. taphonomic change) or inadequately sampled. We investigated the influence of patterns in cumulative increase on dead assemblages for sea-level reconstructions through the development of foraminiferal-based transfer functions. The cumulative transfer functions suggest that the performance improves during the first six sample intervals of the time-series dataset with reconstruction differing by 1.2 m and remains constant thereafter.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-315
Number of pages29
JournalMarine Micropaleontology
Volume58
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 28 2006

Fingerprint

marsh
estuary
sea level
time series
transfer function
carrying capacity
intertidal environment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oceanography
  • Palaeontology

Keywords

  • Foraminifera
  • Salt marsh
  • Sea level
  • Seasonal
  • UK

Cite this

@article{c087cee2b7854e1094667846a6ff7577,
title = "Patterns in cumulative increase in live and dead species from foraminiferal time series of Cowpen Marsh, Tees Estuary, UK: Implications for sea-level studies",
abstract = "We have collected live and dead foraminiferal times-series data at 2-weekly intervals for a 12-month period from the intertidal zone of Cowpen Marsh, Tees Estuary, UK. The data from the 689 samples show profound differences between live and dead assemblages, although assemblages are dominated by just three species, Haynesina germanica, Jadammina macrescens and Trochammina inflata, which represent over 70{\%} of the assemblage. The cumulative increase in species of most environments approximates to a lognormal or log series. None of the datasets show a broken stick pattern. The cumulative maximum number of species, which represents the species carrying capacity of the environment, is recorded earlier in the life assemblages than the dead counterparts. The dead assemblage of Cowpen Marsh is found to have a higher abundance (435 compared to 163 individuals/10 cm3) and number of species (52 compared to 28) than its live counterpart because the dead assemblage represents many generations added over a long period of time. In contrast, some species are recorded in the live dataset that were not found in the dead assemblage, indicating the dead record is either incomplete (e.g. taphonomic change) or inadequately sampled. We investigated the influence of patterns in cumulative increase on dead assemblages for sea-level reconstructions through the development of foraminiferal-based transfer functions. The cumulative transfer functions suggest that the performance improves during the first six sample intervals of the time-series dataset with reconstruction differing by 1.2 m and remains constant thereafter.",
keywords = "Foraminifera, Salt marsh, Sea level, Seasonal, UK",
author = "Benjamin Horton and Murray, {John W.}",
year = "2006",
month = "2",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1016/j.marmicro.2005.10.006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "58",
pages = "287--315",
journal = "Marine Micropaleontology",
issn = "0377-8398",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patterns in cumulative increase in live and dead species from foraminiferal time series of Cowpen Marsh, Tees Estuary, UK

T2 - Implications for sea-level studies

AU - Horton, Benjamin

AU - Murray, John W.

PY - 2006/2/28

Y1 - 2006/2/28

N2 - We have collected live and dead foraminiferal times-series data at 2-weekly intervals for a 12-month period from the intertidal zone of Cowpen Marsh, Tees Estuary, UK. The data from the 689 samples show profound differences between live and dead assemblages, although assemblages are dominated by just three species, Haynesina germanica, Jadammina macrescens and Trochammina inflata, which represent over 70% of the assemblage. The cumulative increase in species of most environments approximates to a lognormal or log series. None of the datasets show a broken stick pattern. The cumulative maximum number of species, which represents the species carrying capacity of the environment, is recorded earlier in the life assemblages than the dead counterparts. The dead assemblage of Cowpen Marsh is found to have a higher abundance (435 compared to 163 individuals/10 cm3) and number of species (52 compared to 28) than its live counterpart because the dead assemblage represents many generations added over a long period of time. In contrast, some species are recorded in the live dataset that were not found in the dead assemblage, indicating the dead record is either incomplete (e.g. taphonomic change) or inadequately sampled. We investigated the influence of patterns in cumulative increase on dead assemblages for sea-level reconstructions through the development of foraminiferal-based transfer functions. The cumulative transfer functions suggest that the performance improves during the first six sample intervals of the time-series dataset with reconstruction differing by 1.2 m and remains constant thereafter.

AB - We have collected live and dead foraminiferal times-series data at 2-weekly intervals for a 12-month period from the intertidal zone of Cowpen Marsh, Tees Estuary, UK. The data from the 689 samples show profound differences between live and dead assemblages, although assemblages are dominated by just three species, Haynesina germanica, Jadammina macrescens and Trochammina inflata, which represent over 70% of the assemblage. The cumulative increase in species of most environments approximates to a lognormal or log series. None of the datasets show a broken stick pattern. The cumulative maximum number of species, which represents the species carrying capacity of the environment, is recorded earlier in the life assemblages than the dead counterparts. The dead assemblage of Cowpen Marsh is found to have a higher abundance (435 compared to 163 individuals/10 cm3) and number of species (52 compared to 28) than its live counterpart because the dead assemblage represents many generations added over a long period of time. In contrast, some species are recorded in the live dataset that were not found in the dead assemblage, indicating the dead record is either incomplete (e.g. taphonomic change) or inadequately sampled. We investigated the influence of patterns in cumulative increase on dead assemblages for sea-level reconstructions through the development of foraminiferal-based transfer functions. The cumulative transfer functions suggest that the performance improves during the first six sample intervals of the time-series dataset with reconstruction differing by 1.2 m and remains constant thereafter.

KW - Foraminifera

KW - Salt marsh

KW - Sea level

KW - Seasonal

KW - UK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=32344446252&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=32344446252&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.marmicro.2005.10.006

DO - 10.1016/j.marmicro.2005.10.006

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:32344446252

VL - 58

SP - 287

EP - 315

JO - Marine Micropaleontology

JF - Marine Micropaleontology

SN - 0377-8398

IS - 4

ER -