Perceptions of family relations when mothers and fathers are depicted with different parenting styles

Ann V. McGillicuddy-De Lisi, Richard De Lisi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

College students (N = 125) reported their perceptions of family relations in response to vignettes that presented 5 different parenting styles. Participants viewed family relations as most positive when parents were portrayed as authoritative or permissive and as most negative when parents were portrayed as uninvolved-neglecting or authoritarian. Student gender and parent gender effects qualified these findings. Female students reported family relations to be less positive than did male students when parents were depicted as authoritarian or as uninvolved-neglecting, and they rated family relations more positively than did male students when parents were depicted as permissive. Participants viewed family relations as more positive when mothers rather than fathers were presented as permissive and when fathers rather than mothers were depicted as authoritarian. The authors discuss the findings of the study in relation to theories of beliefs about children and implications for future parenting styles of male and female college students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)425-442
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Genetic Psychology
Volume168
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Keywords

  • Childrearing
  • Family relations
  • Gender effects
  • Parenting styles

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