Peripheral Pruning: A Safe Approach to Thinning Extra-Large Anterolateral Thigh Flaps

Stephen L. Viviano, Farrah C. Liu, Paul J. Therattil, Edward S. Lee, Jonathan D. Keith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Thinning of anterolateral thigh (ALT) flaps has been described to achieve optimal contouring. Previous studies caution against thinning large flaps owing to the risk of vascular compromise leading to partial or total flap necrosis. This study aims to demonstrate a reliably safe method for thinning extra-large (>240 cm) flaps. METHODS: A retrospective review of 53 consecutive ALT flaps performed at a single institution was completed. Of these flaps, 18 (34%) were thinned primarily by sharp excision of sub-Scarpa's fat along the periphery of the flap using loupe magnification. A central cuff of fat is left to surround and protect the perforator. RESULTS: There were 53 total flaps in our series. Eighteen of the flaps were thinned by peripheral pruning. Eleven (61%) of the flaps reconstructed defects of the lower extremity, whereas 4 (22%) reconstructed upper extremity defects and 3 (17%) reconstructed scalp defects (Table 1). The mean size of the thinned flap group was 35% larger than the nonthinned group (n = 18, 261 cm ± 109 cm vs n = 35, 192 cm ± 146 cm). Ten thinned flaps (55%) were extra large, with flap areas over 240 cm. The average amount of excised fat weighed 41 g ± 18 g. The average body mass index in the thinned flap group was 28.8 kg/m, which is classified as overweight. The average body mass index in the nonthinned flap group was 24.6 kg/m, which is classified as normal weight (Table 2). There were no cases of partial flap necrosis in the thinned flap group. A single case of total flap loss occurred in the thinned flap group secondary to hematoma formation during administration of therapeutic heparin for a mechanical heart valve. There were no other complications in the thinned flap group. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to demonstrate a reliable technique for primary thinning of extra-large ALT flaps in the Western population. No complications related to thinning were observed. Peripheral pruning of sub-Scarpa's fat is a safe and reliable method of thinning extra-large ALT flaps without increasing the risk of flap necrosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S164-S167
JournalAnnals of plastic surgery
Volume80
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

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