Physician beliefs regarding effectiveness of tobacco dependence treatments: Results from the NJ health care provider tobacco survey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Physicians play an increasing role in tobacco dependence treatment as more prescription medications and community resources are developed. Beliefs about effectiveness can influence physicians' recommendations regarding treatment, so it is critical that these beliefs are evidence-based. OBJECTIVE: Describe physicians' beliefs regarding effectiveness of tobacco treatments. DESIGN: Self-reported, cross-sectional, mailed survey. PARTICIPANTS: 336 primary care physicians in New Jersey (60.3% response). MEASUREMENTS: Demographics, previous tobacco dependence training, awareness of guidelines, and perceived effectiveness of treatments. RESULTS: Physicians believed combination medications and bupropion to be the most effective (89 and 88% reported somewhat or very effective, respectively) and nicotine nasal spray least effective (50%). For nonpharmacologic treatments, physicians believed behavioral counseling (69%) and programs including group treatment (67%) were most effective, whereas telephone counseling (25%) and internet-based treatment (23%) were the least. Female and non-U.S.-trained physicians generally believed treatments to be more effective. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians in this sample believed that most cessation medications available and behavioral and group-based counseling are effective, which is supported by current evidence in the field. Low perceived effectiveness of telephone and internet treatments could hinder their utilization. Perceived effectiveness may affect physician recommendations. Therefore, training efforts to influence these beliefs warrant further attention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1459-1462
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
Volume22
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2007

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

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