Planning against biological terrorism: Lessons from outbreak investigations

David A. Ashford, Robyn M. Kaiser, Michael E. Bales, Kathleen Shutt, Amee Patrawalla, Andre McShan, Jordan W. Tappero, Bradley A. Perkins, Andrew L. Dannenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined outbreak investigations conducted around the world from 1988 to 1999 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Epidemic Intelligence Service. In 44 (4.0%) of 1,099 investigations, identified causative agents had bioterrorism potential. In six investigations, intentional use of infectious agents was considered. Healthcare providers reported 270 (24.6%) outbreaks and infection control practitioners reported 129 (11.7%); together they reported 399 (36.3%) of the outbreaks. Health departments reported 335 (30.5%) outbreaks. For six outbreaks in which bioterrorism or intentional contamination was possible, reporting was delayed for up to 26 days. We confirmed that the most critical component for bioterrorism outbreak detection and reporting is the frontline healthcare professional and the local health departments. Bioterrorism preparedness should emphasize education and support of this frontline as well as methods to shorten the time between outbreak and reporting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)515-519
Number of pages5
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2003

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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