Predictive analytical and thermal modeling of orthogonal cutting process-part II: Effect of tool flank wear on tool forces, stresses, and temperature distributions

Yiǧit Karpat, Tuǧrul Özel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper, predictive modeling of cutting and ploughing forces, stress distributions on tool faces, and temperature distributions in the presence of tool flank wear are presented. The analytical and thermal modeling of orthogonal cutting that is introduced in Part I of the paper is extended for worn tool case in order to study the effect of flank wear on the predictions. Work material constitutive model based formulations of tool forces and stress distributions at tool rake and worn flank faces are utilized in calculating nonuniform heat intensities and heat partition ratios induced by shearing, tool-chip interface friction, and tool flank face-workpiece interface contacts. In order to model forces and stress distributions under the flank wear zone, a force model from Waldorf (1996) ("Shearing Ploughing, and Wear in Orthogonal Machining," Ph.D. thesis, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL) is adapted. Model is tested and validated for temperature and force predictions in machining of AISI 1045 steel and AL 6061-T6 aluminum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-453
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering, Transactions of the ASME
Volume128
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Keywords

  • Flank wear
  • Heat partition
  • Heat source method
  • Nonlinear heat intensity
  • Temperature distributions

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