Prevalence and correlates of indoor tanning among US adults

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

100 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Little is known about the prevalence of indoor tanning among the US general adult population. Objectives: This study sought to: (1) describe the prevalence of indoor tanning throughout adulthood; (2) identify demographic and psychosocial correlates of indoor tanning; and (3) determine whether these correlates vary by age group. Methods: This study used data from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey, an annual health survey of the US adult population. Results: Indoor tanning rates were higher among individuals who were young, white, and female. Rates of indoor tanning in the last year varied from 20.4% for those aged 18 to 29 years to 7.8% for those aged 65 years and older. A variety of demographic, health, and behavioral health risk factors correlated with indoor tanning. Limitations: The study design was cross-sectional and all data were self-reported. Conclusions: Health care providers should address indoor tanning as a health risk factor across the lifespan.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)769-780
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume58
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Tanning
Health Surveys
Health
Demography
Health Personnel
Population
Age Groups
Interviews

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology

Cite this

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title = "Prevalence and correlates of indoor tanning among US adults",
abstract = "Background: Little is known about the prevalence of indoor tanning among the US general adult population. Objectives: This study sought to: (1) describe the prevalence of indoor tanning throughout adulthood; (2) identify demographic and psychosocial correlates of indoor tanning; and (3) determine whether these correlates vary by age group. Methods: This study used data from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey, an annual health survey of the US adult population. Results: Indoor tanning rates were higher among individuals who were young, white, and female. Rates of indoor tanning in the last year varied from 20.4{\%} for those aged 18 to 29 years to 7.8{\%} for those aged 65 years and older. A variety of demographic, health, and behavioral health risk factors correlated with indoor tanning. Limitations: The study design was cross-sectional and all data were self-reported. Conclusions: Health care providers should address indoor tanning as a health risk factor across the lifespan.",
author = "Heckman, {Carolyn J.} and Coups, {Elliot J.} and Manne, {Sharon L.}",
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T1 - Prevalence and correlates of indoor tanning among US adults

AU - Heckman, Carolyn J.

AU - Coups, Elliot J.

AU - Manne, Sharon L.

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N2 - Background: Little is known about the prevalence of indoor tanning among the US general adult population. Objectives: This study sought to: (1) describe the prevalence of indoor tanning throughout adulthood; (2) identify demographic and psychosocial correlates of indoor tanning; and (3) determine whether these correlates vary by age group. Methods: This study used data from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey, an annual health survey of the US adult population. Results: Indoor tanning rates were higher among individuals who were young, white, and female. Rates of indoor tanning in the last year varied from 20.4% for those aged 18 to 29 years to 7.8% for those aged 65 years and older. A variety of demographic, health, and behavioral health risk factors correlated with indoor tanning. Limitations: The study design was cross-sectional and all data were self-reported. Conclusions: Health care providers should address indoor tanning as a health risk factor across the lifespan.

AB - Background: Little is known about the prevalence of indoor tanning among the US general adult population. Objectives: This study sought to: (1) describe the prevalence of indoor tanning throughout adulthood; (2) identify demographic and psychosocial correlates of indoor tanning; and (3) determine whether these correlates vary by age group. Methods: This study used data from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey, an annual health survey of the US adult population. Results: Indoor tanning rates were higher among individuals who were young, white, and female. Rates of indoor tanning in the last year varied from 20.4% for those aged 18 to 29 years to 7.8% for those aged 65 years and older. A variety of demographic, health, and behavioral health risk factors correlated with indoor tanning. Limitations: The study design was cross-sectional and all data were self-reported. Conclusions: Health care providers should address indoor tanning as a health risk factor across the lifespan.

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