Prevalence, predictors, and outcomes in treatment-resistant hypertension in patients with coronary disease

Sripal Bangalore, Rana Fayyad, Rachel Laskey, David A. Demicco, Prakash Deedwania, John Kostis, Franz H. Messerli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Increasingly, apparent treatment-resistant hypertension has been recognized. However, much of the prevalence, predictors, and outcomes are largely unknown, especially in patients with coronary artery disease. Methods: We evaluated 10,001 patients with coronary artery disease who were enrolled in the Treating to New Targets trial. Apparent treatment-resistant hypertension was defined as blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg despite 3 antihypertensive agents or <140 mm Hg with ≥4 antihypertensive agents. The primary outcome was major cardiovascular events (composite of fatal coronary heart disease, nonfatal myocardial infarction, resuscitated cardiac arrest, and stroke). Results: Among the 10,001 patients in the trial, 1112 (11.1%) had apparent treatment-resistant hypertension. In a multivariable model adjusting for baseline differences, the treatment-resistant hypertension group had a 64% increase in primary outcome (hazard ratio [HR], 1.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39-1.94; P <.001), driven by a 69% increase in coronary heart disease death (HR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.22, 2.34; P =.001) and 73% increase in nonfatal myocardial infarction (HR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.39-2.16, P <.0001) when compared with the no apparent treatment-resistant hypertension group. In addition, patients with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension had a 71% increase in major coronary event (P <.0001), 45% increase in death (P =.001), 33% increase in heart failure (P =.05), 53% increase in any cardiovascular event (P <.0001), 60% increase in any coronary event (P <.0001), 68% increase in angina (P <.0001), and 51% increase in coronary revascularization (P <.0001) when compared with the no apparent treatment-resistant hypertension group. Results were largely similar whether the definition of apparent treatment-resistant hypertension was based on a blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg despite 3 agents or a blood pressure <140 mm Hg with ≥4 agents. Conclusions: In patients with coronary artery disease, apparent treatment-resistant hypertension is associated with a marked increase in the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, including an increase in all-cause death.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-81.e1
JournalAmerican Journal of Medicine
Volume127
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Keywords

  • Outcome
  • Predictors
  • Prevalence
  • Resistant hypertension

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