Problem solving and personality characteristics related to differing levels of intelligence and ideational fluency

John C. Houtz, Robert Denmark, Sylvia Rosenfield, Toby J. Tetenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Eighty intellectually gifted fourth, fifth, and sixth graders were given divergent thinking and problem solving tasks and measures of tolerance for ambiguity, locus of control, and self-esteem. Four comparison groups included: (1) higher fluency and higher IQ; (2) higher fluency but lower IQ; (3) lower fluency but higher IQ; and (4) lower fluency and lower IQ. Higher-fluency children were more tolerant of ambiguity, internally oriented, positive in self-esteem, and better problem solvers and school achievers. In agreement with several writers, these results emphasize the consistency which can be found among the cognitive and affective dimensions associated with divergent or creative thinking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)118-123
Number of pages6
JournalContemporary Educational Psychology
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1980
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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