Production of metal nanoparticles by pulsed laser-ablation in liquids: A tool for studying the antibacterial properties of nanoparticles

Matthew Ratti, Joseph J. Naddeo, Julianne C. Griepenburg, Sean M. O’Malley, Daniel M. Bubb, Eric A. Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria is a global clinical concern leading some to speculate about our return to a "pre-antibiotics" era of medicine. In addition to efforts to identify novel small-molecule antimicrobial drugs, there has been great interest in the use of metal nanoparticles as coatings for medical devices, wound dressings, and consumer packaging, due to their antimicrobial properties. The wide variety of methods available for nanoparticle synthesis results in a broad spectrum of chemical and physical properties which can affect antibacterial efficacy. This manuscript describes the pulsed laser-ablation in liquids (PLAL) method to create nanoparticles. This approach allows for the fine tuning of nanoparticle size, composition, and stability using post-irradiation methods as well as the addition of surfactants or volume excluders. By controlling particle size and composition, a large range of physical and chemical properties of metal nanoparticles can be explored which may contribute to their antimicrobial efficacy thereby opening new avenues for antibacterial development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere55146
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Volume2017
Issue number124
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial
  • Bioengineering
  • E. coli
  • Issue 124
  • Microbiology
  • Nanoparticles
  • Post-irradiation
  • Pulsed laser-ablation in liquids
  • Silver toxicity

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