Prospective study of human immunodeficiency virus 1-related disease among 512 infants born to infected women in New York City

Mahrukh Bamji, Donald M. Thea, Jeremy Weedon, Keith Krasinski, Pamela B. Matheson, Pauline Thomas, Genevieve Lambert, Elaine J. Abrams, Rick Steketee, Margaret Heagarty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To determine the incidence of HIV-1-related clinical findings, mortality and predictors of death in a cohort of HIV-exposed infants followed from birth. Methods. Data were collected approximately bimonthly during the first and second year of life and used in Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards survival analyses to predict time to the development of symptoms and death. Results. One hundred sixteen infected and 396 uninfected infants were followed for a median of 26 months at 7 New York City hospitals from 1986 to 1995. Two or more nonspecific HIV-related symptoms, AIDS or death occurred in 83% of infected children by the first year. Fifty infected infants (43%) developed AIDS and 19 (38%) of these had Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Estimated median age at AIDS/death was 30 months and 64% of infected children remained alive and AIDS-free at 1 year. Estimated infant mortality among infected children was 160/1000 live births, and median survival after AIDS was 21 months; 55% of infected children survived >12 months after diagnosis of AIDS. P. carinii pneumonia was the most common cause of death. Although birth CD4 values did not predict AIDS or death, CD4 counts as early as 6 months of age were highly correlated with both. Thirteen (68%) of 19 infants who remained AIDS-free up to 3 to 6 months of age with CD4 count ≤1500 cells/μl subsequently developed AIDS vs. 18 (30%) of 61 with CD4 count >1500 (P = 0.0001). Conclusions. Most HIV-1- infected infants develop disease in the first year of life. AIDS or death can be predicted by a threshold CD4 count of 1500 cells/μl at 3 to 6 months of age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)891-898
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume15
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

HIV-1
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Prospective Studies
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Pneumocystis Pneumonia
HIV
Parturition
Urban Hospitals
Live Birth
Infant Mortality
Survival Analysis
Cause of Death
Survival
Mortality
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Bamji, Mahrukh ; Thea, Donald M. ; Weedon, Jeremy ; Krasinski, Keith ; Matheson, Pamela B. ; Thomas, Pauline ; Lambert, Genevieve ; Abrams, Elaine J. ; Steketee, Rick ; Heagarty, Margaret. / Prospective study of human immunodeficiency virus 1-related disease among 512 infants born to infected women in New York City. In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. 1996 ; Vol. 15, No. 10. pp. 891-898.
@article{0cce5b5b40ff47019ae083e470650eef,
title = "Prospective study of human immunodeficiency virus 1-related disease among 512 infants born to infected women in New York City",
abstract = "Objective. To determine the incidence of HIV-1-related clinical findings, mortality and predictors of death in a cohort of HIV-exposed infants followed from birth. Methods. Data were collected approximately bimonthly during the first and second year of life and used in Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards survival analyses to predict time to the development of symptoms and death. Results. One hundred sixteen infected and 396 uninfected infants were followed for a median of 26 months at 7 New York City hospitals from 1986 to 1995. Two or more nonspecific HIV-related symptoms, AIDS or death occurred in 83{\%} of infected children by the first year. Fifty infected infants (43{\%}) developed AIDS and 19 (38{\%}) of these had Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Estimated median age at AIDS/death was 30 months and 64{\%} of infected children remained alive and AIDS-free at 1 year. Estimated infant mortality among infected children was 160/1000 live births, and median survival after AIDS was 21 months; 55{\%} of infected children survived >12 months after diagnosis of AIDS. P. carinii pneumonia was the most common cause of death. Although birth CD4 values did not predict AIDS or death, CD4 counts as early as 6 months of age were highly correlated with both. Thirteen (68{\%}) of 19 infants who remained AIDS-free up to 3 to 6 months of age with CD4 count ≤1500 cells/μl subsequently developed AIDS vs. 18 (30{\%}) of 61 with CD4 count >1500 (P = 0.0001). Conclusions. Most HIV-1- infected infants develop disease in the first year of life. AIDS or death can be predicted by a threshold CD4 count of 1500 cells/μl at 3 to 6 months of age.",
author = "Mahrukh Bamji and Thea, {Donald M.} and Jeremy Weedon and Keith Krasinski and Matheson, {Pamela B.} and Pauline Thomas and Genevieve Lambert and Abrams, {Elaine J.} and Rick Steketee and Margaret Heagarty",
year = "1996",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00006454-199610000-00012",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
pages = "891--898",
journal = "Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal",
issn = "0891-3668",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "10",

}

Bamji, M, Thea, DM, Weedon, J, Krasinski, K, Matheson, PB, Thomas, P, Lambert, G, Abrams, EJ, Steketee, R & Heagarty, M 1996, 'Prospective study of human immunodeficiency virus 1-related disease among 512 infants born to infected women in New York City', Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 15, no. 10, pp. 891-898. https://doi.org/10.1097/00006454-199610000-00012

Prospective study of human immunodeficiency virus 1-related disease among 512 infants born to infected women in New York City. / Bamji, Mahrukh; Thea, Donald M.; Weedon, Jeremy; Krasinski, Keith; Matheson, Pamela B.; Thomas, Pauline; Lambert, Genevieve; Abrams, Elaine J.; Steketee, Rick; Heagarty, Margaret.

In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, Vol. 15, No. 10, 01.10.1996, p. 891-898.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prospective study of human immunodeficiency virus 1-related disease among 512 infants born to infected women in New York City

AU - Bamji, Mahrukh

AU - Thea, Donald M.

AU - Weedon, Jeremy

AU - Krasinski, Keith

AU - Matheson, Pamela B.

AU - Thomas, Pauline

AU - Lambert, Genevieve

AU - Abrams, Elaine J.

AU - Steketee, Rick

AU - Heagarty, Margaret

PY - 1996/10/1

Y1 - 1996/10/1

N2 - Objective. To determine the incidence of HIV-1-related clinical findings, mortality and predictors of death in a cohort of HIV-exposed infants followed from birth. Methods. Data were collected approximately bimonthly during the first and second year of life and used in Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards survival analyses to predict time to the development of symptoms and death. Results. One hundred sixteen infected and 396 uninfected infants were followed for a median of 26 months at 7 New York City hospitals from 1986 to 1995. Two or more nonspecific HIV-related symptoms, AIDS or death occurred in 83% of infected children by the first year. Fifty infected infants (43%) developed AIDS and 19 (38%) of these had Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Estimated median age at AIDS/death was 30 months and 64% of infected children remained alive and AIDS-free at 1 year. Estimated infant mortality among infected children was 160/1000 live births, and median survival after AIDS was 21 months; 55% of infected children survived >12 months after diagnosis of AIDS. P. carinii pneumonia was the most common cause of death. Although birth CD4 values did not predict AIDS or death, CD4 counts as early as 6 months of age were highly correlated with both. Thirteen (68%) of 19 infants who remained AIDS-free up to 3 to 6 months of age with CD4 count ≤1500 cells/μl subsequently developed AIDS vs. 18 (30%) of 61 with CD4 count >1500 (P = 0.0001). Conclusions. Most HIV-1- infected infants develop disease in the first year of life. AIDS or death can be predicted by a threshold CD4 count of 1500 cells/μl at 3 to 6 months of age.

AB - Objective. To determine the incidence of HIV-1-related clinical findings, mortality and predictors of death in a cohort of HIV-exposed infants followed from birth. Methods. Data were collected approximately bimonthly during the first and second year of life and used in Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards survival analyses to predict time to the development of symptoms and death. Results. One hundred sixteen infected and 396 uninfected infants were followed for a median of 26 months at 7 New York City hospitals from 1986 to 1995. Two or more nonspecific HIV-related symptoms, AIDS or death occurred in 83% of infected children by the first year. Fifty infected infants (43%) developed AIDS and 19 (38%) of these had Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Estimated median age at AIDS/death was 30 months and 64% of infected children remained alive and AIDS-free at 1 year. Estimated infant mortality among infected children was 160/1000 live births, and median survival after AIDS was 21 months; 55% of infected children survived >12 months after diagnosis of AIDS. P. carinii pneumonia was the most common cause of death. Although birth CD4 values did not predict AIDS or death, CD4 counts as early as 6 months of age were highly correlated with both. Thirteen (68%) of 19 infants who remained AIDS-free up to 3 to 6 months of age with CD4 count ≤1500 cells/μl subsequently developed AIDS vs. 18 (30%) of 61 with CD4 count >1500 (P = 0.0001). Conclusions. Most HIV-1- infected infants develop disease in the first year of life. AIDS or death can be predicted by a threshold CD4 count of 1500 cells/μl at 3 to 6 months of age.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=16044367057&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=16044367057&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00006454-199610000-00012

DO - 10.1097/00006454-199610000-00012

M3 - Article

C2 - 8895922

AN - SCOPUS:16044367057

VL - 15

SP - 891

EP - 898

JO - Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

JF - Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

SN - 0891-3668

IS - 10

ER -