Psychosocial Syndemic Classes and Longitudinal Transition Patterns Among Sexual Minority men Living with or Without HIV in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS)

Yiyang Liu, Stephen D. Ramos, David B. Hanna, Deborah L. Jones, Jason M. Lazar, Jorge R. Kizer, Mardge H. Cohen, Sabina A. Haberlen, Adaora A. Adimora, Cecile D. Lahiri, Jenni M. Wise, Mackey R. Friedman, Michael Plankey, Natalie E. Chichetto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Mental health and substance use epidemics interact to create psychosocial syndemics, accelerating poor health outcomes. Using latent class and latent transition analyses, we identified psychosocial syndemic phenotypes and their longitudinal transition pathways among sexual minority men (SMM) in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS, n = 3,384, mean age 44, 29% non-Hispanic Black, 51% with HIV). Self-reported depressive symptoms and substance use indices (i.e., smoking, hazardous drinking, marijuana, stimulant, and popper use) at the index visit, 3-year and 6-year follow-up were used to model psychosocial syndemics. Four latent classes were identified: “poly-behavioral” (19.4%), “smoking and depression” (21.7%), “illicit drug use” (13.8%), and “no conditions” (45.1%). Across all classes, over 80% of SMM remained in that same class over the follow-ups. SMM who experienced certain psychosocial clusters (e.g., illicit drug use) were less likely to transition to a less complex class. These people could benefit from targeted public health intervention and greater access to treatment resources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4094-4105
Number of pages12
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume27
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Keywords

  • HIV
  • Mental Health
  • Psychosocial Syndemic
  • Sexual Minority Men
  • Substance Use

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