Relating computer, communication, and computer-mediated communication apprehensions to new communication technology use in the workplace

Craig R. Scott, C. Erik Timmerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study explores three issues regarding the use of multiple workplace communication technologies: the relationships between distinct forms of apprehension (computer, communication, and writing) and use, the relative contribution of computer-mediated communication (CMC) apprehension for predicting use, and changes in these relationships over time. A trend study, which consisted of the collection of data from two samples (N = 205) separated by a 5-year interval, suggests full or partial support for the hypotheses involving computer and communication apprehension. Although apprehension levels remain stable, usage frequency changed for several of the technologies examined - resulting in stronger relationships between apprehensions and those technologies for which use has changed the most in the past 5 years. Most notably, a new measure of CMC apprehension generally predicts communication technology use - especially text-based and conferencing tools - more strongly than do more traditional apprehension types.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)683-725
Number of pages43
JournalCommunication Research
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication
  • Linguistics and Language

Keywords

  • Communication apprehension
  • Communication technology
  • Computer anxiety
  • Computer-mediated communication
  • New media
  • Organizational communication
  • Technology use
  • Technostress

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