Religious involvement and perceived social support: Interactive effects on cardiovascular reactivity to laboratory stressors

Yung Y. Chen, Richard J. Contrada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Religious involvement has been linked to reduced risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This may reflect lower cardiovascular reactivity (CVR) among individuals high in religious involvement. The relationship between religious involvement and reactivity may overlap with the effects of other psychosocial factors. This study examined religious involvement, social support, and hostility in relation to CVR in the laboratory. Results showed an interactive effect of perceived social support and religious involvement on systolic blood pressure (SBP) reactivity. Participants reporting a high level of religious involvement showed lower SBP reactivity only when they also reported high levels of social support. These findings encourage further research on the unique and conjoint effects of religiousness and other psychosocial variables on CVR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Applied Biobehavioral Research
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Religious involvement and perceived social support: Interactive effects on cardiovascular reactivity to laboratory stressors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this