Residual gas and storage conditions affect sensory quality of diced pears in flexible retortable pouches

Stephanie Clark, Heidi Warner, Jose J. Rodríguez, Guadalupe I. Olivas, David Sepúlveda, Rieks Bruins, Gustavo V. Barbosa-Cánovas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Diced pears packed in flexible retortable pouches were manufactured to obtain packages with 10, 15, 20 and 30 cm3 residual gas, then stored at 4.4, 26.7 and 37.8 °C for six months. The 2-furaldehyde and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde values increased and pears turned darker, softer, more homogeneous in shape/size, less fruity in flavor and aroma, and less acceptable to consumers over time. Elevated temperatures and high residual gas levels were particularly detrimental to pear quality. Highest quality was maintained for 6 months when pears packaged at any residual gas level were stored at 4.4 °C. Acceptable quality was maintained for 6 months in pears packaged with less than 30 cm3 residual gas, stored at 26.7 °C. Pear quality declined most rapidly at 37.8 °C, 30 cm3 residual gas. Residual gas volume of 15 cm3 should not be exceeded to maintain highest quality and acceptability of diced pears packed in flexible retortable pouches.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-162
Number of pages10
JournalFood Quality and Preference
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Keywords

  • Flexible retortable pouches
  • Pears
  • Residual gas
  • Sensory
  • Temperature

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