Risk of police-involved death by race/ethnicity and place, United States, 2012-2018

Frank Edwards, Michael H. Esposito, Hedwig Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. To estimate the risk of mortality from police homicide by race/ethnicity and place in the United States. Methods. We used novel data on police-involved fatalities and Bayesian models to estimate mortality risk for Black, Latino, and White men for all US counties by Census division and metropolitan area type. Results. Police kill, on average, 2.8 men per day. Police were responsible for about 8% of all homicides with adult male victims between 2012 and 2018. Black men's mortality risk is between 1.9 and 2.4 deaths per 100 000 per year, Latino risk is between 0.8 and 1.2, and White risk is between 0.6 and 0.7. Conclusions. Police homicide risk is higher than suggested by official data. Black and Latino men are at higher risk for death than are White men, and these disparities vary markedly across place. Public Health Implications. Homicide reduction efforts should consider interventions to reduce the use of lethal force by police. Efforts to address unequal police violence should target places with high mortality risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1241-1248
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume108
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2018
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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