Risk scientists and government regulation of ethical behavior: A comparative analysis of opponents and proponents

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

A mail survey instrument was sent to almost 1,500 members of three professional organizations whose participants study health and environmental risk. Members were asked their opinions about the effectiveness of government auditing of data, research designs, and facilities. Respondents who thought auditing would be effective were outnumbered 6 to 1 by those who thought it would be ineffective. Supporters tended to be less experienced than opponents. They disproportionately had earned baccalaureate or masters degrees as their terminal degree, not doctoral degrees. Supporters had jobs that required data for regulatory purposes, and they perceived that incompetence and pressure lead to misconduct.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-176
Number of pages8
JournalAccountability in Research
Volume3
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Library and Information Sciences

Keywords

  • Risk analysis
  • auditing
  • intervention
  • misconduct

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