Role of postsynaptic density protein-95 in the maintenance of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats

F. Tao, Y. X. Tao, P. Mao, R. A. Johns

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our previous work has demonstrated that postsynaptic density protein-95, a molecular scaffolding protein that binds and clusters N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors at neuronal synapses, plays an important role in the development of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. The current study further investigated the possible involvement of postsynaptic density protein-95 in the maintenance of neuropathic pain. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were induced within 3 days and maintained for 15 days or longer after unilateral injury to the fifth lumbar spinal nerve. The rats injected intrathecally with postsynaptic density protein-95 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide every 24 h for 4 days from day 7 to day 10 post-surgery exhibited not only a marked decrease in spinal cord postsynaptic density protein-95 protein expression but also a significant reduction in mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia on day 11 post-surgery. The rats injected with sense oligodeoxynucleotide did not display these changes. However, in the rats without nerve injury, postsynaptic density protein-95 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide given intrathecally every 24 h for 4 days did not affect responses to mechanical and thermal stimulation. In addition, postsynaptic density protein-95 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide did not change locomotor activity of experimental animals. Our results indicate that the deficiency of postsynaptic density protein-95 protein in the spinal cord significantly attenuates nerve injury-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia during both the development and maintenance of chronic neuropathic pain. These results suggest that postsynaptic density protein-95 might be involved in the central mechanisms of chronic neuropathic pain and provide a novel target for development of new pain therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)731-739
Number of pages9
JournalNeuroscience
Volume117
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 31 2003

Fingerprint

Peripheral Nerve Injuries
Neuralgia
Hyperalgesia
Maintenance
Oligodeoxyribonucleotides
Chronic Pain
Spinal Cord
Wounds and Injuries
Spinal Nerves
Proteins
postsynaptic density proteins
Locomotion
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Synapses
Hot Temperature
Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Keywords

  • Antisense technology
  • Central sensitization
  • Hyperalgesia
  • Intrathecal injection
  • Spinal cord

Cite this

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Role of postsynaptic density protein-95 in the maintenance of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats. / Tao, F.; Tao, Y. X.; Mao, P.; Johns, R. A.

In: Neuroscience, Vol. 117, No. 3, 31.03.2003, p. 731-739.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Tao, Y. X.

AU - Mao, P.

AU - Johns, R. A.

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