Salicylic acid: A likely endogenous signal in the resistance response of tobacco to viral infection

Jocelyn Malamy, John P. Carr, Daniel F. Klessig, Ilya Raskin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

937 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Some cultivars of tobacco are resistant to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and synthesize pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins upon infection. In a search for the signal or signals that induce resistance or PR genes, it was found that the endogenous salicylic acid levels in resistant, but not susceptible, cultivars increased at least 20-fold in infected leaves and 5-fold in uninfected leaves after TMV inoculation. Induction of PR1 genes paralleled the rise in salicylic acid levels. Since earlier work has demonstrated that treatment with exogenous salicylic acid induces PR genes and resistance, these findings suggest that salicylic acid functions as the natural transduction signal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1002-1004
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume250
Issue number4983
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

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Salicylic Acid
Virus Diseases
Tobacco
Tobacco Mosaic Virus
Genes
Signal Transduction
Infection
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Malamy, Jocelyn ; Carr, John P. ; Klessig, Daniel F. ; Raskin, Ilya. / Salicylic acid : A likely endogenous signal in the resistance response of tobacco to viral infection. In: Science. 1990 ; Vol. 250, No. 4983. pp. 1002-1004.
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Salicylic acid : A likely endogenous signal in the resistance response of tobacco to viral infection. / Malamy, Jocelyn; Carr, John P.; Klessig, Daniel F.; Raskin, Ilya.

In: Science, Vol. 250, No. 4983, 01.01.1990, p. 1002-1004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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